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The Pros And Cons Of Real Estate Wholesaling

Published on Friday - March 25, 2016

If you enjoy keeping up to date with market trends, following respected real estate blogs, or are addicted to HGTV, you might have more in common with a real estate investor than you think. Perhaps you’ve been considering a career in real estate for quite some time now, but have yet to take the plunge. Maybe you’ve even come close to making an offer on a property, but the deal fell through because you were too afraid to take action. If the above statements ring true for you, wholesaling just might become your new best friend.

Real estate wholesaling is all about finding properties that are below market value, or being able to negotiate with the seller for a lower price. The most crucial aspect of wholesaling, however, is finding motivated sellers, or people who are looking to sell their properties quickly for whatever reason. There’s always the typical marketing strategies: direct mail marketing, email marketing, content marketing or bandit sign marketing. However, you can also go down to your local city hall and purchase pre-made lists with the contact information of homes that are nearing foreclosure or are distressed.

Once you find the right property and get it under contract, it is time to find a buyer. If you’ve invested in real estate before, you probably already have a solid buyers list. If not, you can find a buyer using the same techniques you employed to find your property. (Note to new investors: remember to keep track of all the information you receive from every potential buyer so that you can begin curating your own buyers list for future references.) When you present the property to your buyer, make sure to keep in mind the after repair value (ARV) and ask for a reasonable price that will benefit both you and your buyer. Don’t get confused; wholesaling is more about selling the contract than it is about selling the property.

Wholesaling is the perfect way to get your feet wet as a real estate investor. Do you know your real estate wholesaling goals? As with any new business opportunity, there are both benefits and disadvantages to the process; make sure to evaluate the pros and cons before getting started:

The PROS Of Wholesalingbenefit of real estate wholesaling

Make Money In Less Time: If you’ve done your due diligence and educated yourself on the process, wholesaling can be a very lucrative business. Wholesaling is great for new investors because it requires little to no personal finances or experience. If you find a respectable deal, don’t be afraid to offer a fairly low price, as there is a good chance they are desperate to sell. In the event your offer is accepted, it is entirely possible to close the deal and get your check in 30 to 45 days or less.

A potential scenario might go as follows: You find a property that you know would be worth at least $125,000 after repairs. You offer $100,000 and put the property under contract. You find a buyer, ask for $115,000 – remember: buy low, sell low – and you close the deal using your own attorney or a title company. Voilà, you’ve just made $15,000 in a relatively short timeframe, and both you and your buyer benefit from the deal. Don’t forget to add your buyer’s information to your buyers list because he or she might want to do business with you in the future, assuming your initial transaction went well.

Learn About The Real Estate Market Quickly: Wholesaling is great for beginners because it fully immerses them into the real estate industry in a short period of time. With the right instruction and education, you will learn the basics of marketing, negotiating, organizing, and acquiring the proper legal documentation. In a sense, a wholesale deal combines many of the aspects of other real estate transactions. With a few wholesale deals under your belt, you will know what to look for in deals and what to avoid.

No Credit Involved And No Cash Required: If your low credit score or limited access to capital is what has been keeping you from investing in real estate, wholesaling is the route you need to take. Even with bad credit, you can participate in a wholesale agreement because you aren’t actually the person purchasing the home. Your eventual buyer is the one who will have the go through the credit check. Another advantage of wholesaling is that you can put as little as $10 down on the property when putting it under contract, which mitigates the personal risk if the deal falls through.

The CONS Of Wholesalingdisadvantage of real estate wholesaling

There Is No Guaranteed Income: Keep in mind, wholesaling is not your typical nine to five job. Of course there is the merit of being your own boss, but unfortunately you are not guaranteed that trusty paycheck every two weeks. There is also no health insurance or retirement benefits that come with wholesaling. Therefore, if you are considering making real estate investing – especially wholesaling – your full time gig, it is essential that you are the type of person who knows how to manage their finances. The best thing you can do is set aside a “rainy day” fund in case a deal does not materialize as planned.

The Inability To Find A Buyer: The key to being a successful wholesaler is having a solid buyers list. In the world of wholesaling, no buyer means no deal. Additionally, your personal risk is contingent on the way your contract is written. So depending on how much you put down in escrow – which, again, could have been as low as $10 – you might have to repay your seller if you are unable to find a buyer. It is best to have potential buyers lined up before even making an offer to the seller. That way, your risk of losing money is substantially lessened. While owing your seller a measly $10 doesn’t sound like a lot, it has a bigger affect on your reputation. If word gets out that you are negatively affecting homeowners, future buyers will be less likely to want to do business with you.

Staying On Top Of An Organized Buyers List: Half the battle of maintaining a successful wholesale business is staying on top of your potential buyers. With the right marketing, and after completing a few deals, you should have a fairly solid list of contacts. However, it is not just about having those contacts. It is about knowing the different preferences of each individual buyer. If you know “Buyer A” prefers properties that he can use as rentals, you will only contact him when you find a property that can meet those needs – i.e. a property that will require less work and is in slightly better condition. If you know that “Buyer B” is a rehabber, you will only offer him properties that are in need of major construction. In Buyer B’s case, the properties you offer to him should be a bit cheaper because they are in worse shape, but will yield a higher return after being repaired. Instead of offering every property you come across to every contact on your buyers list, only reach out to those you truly believe will find value in that particular property. Remember, it will benefit you in the future if both you and your buyer profit from a deal. The last thing you want is to earn a negative reputation. So be sure to stay on top of your list of contacts by taking note of personal tastes. This will ensure that you keep loyal clients.

If after considering these pros and cons wholesaling seems like a business that you can profit from, jump on the bandwagon that many successful investors are already on. If you are driven, disciplined, and organized, there is no limit to how much money you can make in your wholesaling career.

Have you ever successfully completed a wholesale deal? If so, what techniques did you use? Share your stories below:

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